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Village

Leamington Old Town is the historic heart or Royal Leamington Spa - it is the term given to the part of Leamington that sits on the southern bank of the River Leam. Formerly known as Leamington Priors, Leamington began to develop as a town at the start of the 19th century. It was first mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Lamintone. For 400 years, the settlement was under the control of Kenilworth Priory, from which the older suffix derived. Its name came from Anglo-Saxon Leman-tun or Lemen-tun = "farm on the River Leam". The healing properties of the spa waters had been known in Roman times and their rediscovery in 1784 by William Abbotts and Benjamin Satchwell, led to their commercialisation. Early development of the old town centre was on the southern bank of the River Leam. Later builders began concentrating the town's expansion on the land north of the river, resulting in the Georgian centre of New Town with the Leam flowing between the two. By 1901, the population of Leamington had grown from a few hundred to nearly 27,000. The New Town north of the river was laid out on a grid pattern with some wide streets. In the 2nd half of the 20th century the northern part of the town developed to became the main shopping centre with a large House of Fraser department store, other national chain stores including Marks and Spencers and the Royal Priors shopping mall development. The Old Town is crossed by the main railway line and the Grand Union Canal and is characterised by its selection of small independent shops and cafes and restaurants. Business owners and traders got together under the aegis of Old Town Business Association and bid for, and in July 2012, won some funding under the Government's Portas Pilot scheme. The money will be used to breathe new life into the area and make it more attractive for shoppers and visitors. The plans include creating a ‘cafe culture’ in the area and establishing it as a centre for arts, creativity and innovation, attracting more independent retailers and holding more community events such as the recent Diamond Jubilee celebrations in Clemens Street. Other ideas include building on Old Town’s restaurant base and its diverse ethnic food outlets and having commissioned artwork for the area’s railway bridge.

Contact

Leamington Old Town

.

Address

Bath Street,
Leamington Spa,
Warwickshire,
CV31 3AE

Facilities

Leamington Old Town is the historic heart or Royal Leamington Spa - it is the term given to the part of Leamington that sits on the southern bank of the River Leam. Formerly known as Leamington Priors, Leamington began to develop as a town at the start of the 19th century. It was first mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Lamintone. For 400 years, the settlement was under the control of Kenilworth Priory, from which the older suffix derived. Its name came from Anglo-Saxon Leman-tun or Lemen-tun = "farm on the River Leam". The healing properties of the spa waters had been known in Roman times and their rediscovery in 1784 by William Abbotts and Benjamin Satchwell, led to their commercialisation. Early development of the old town centre was on the southern bank of the River Leam. Later builders began concentrating the town's expansion on the land north of the river, resulting in the Georgian centre of New Town with the Leam flowing between the two. By 1901, the population of Leamington had grown from a few hundred to nearly 27,000. The New Town north of the river was laid out on a grid pattern with some wide streets. In the 2nd half of the 20th century the northern part of the town developed to became the main shopping centre with a large House of Fraser department store, other national chain stores including Marks and Spencers and the Royal Priors shopping mall development. The Old Town is crossed by the main railway line and the Grand Union Canal and is characterised by its selection of small independent shops and cafes and restaurants. Business owners and traders got together under the aegis of Old Town Business Association and bid for, and in July 2012, won some funding under the Government's Portas Pilot scheme. The money will be used to breathe new life into the area and make it more attractive for shoppers and visitors. The plans include creating a ‘cafe culture’ in the area and establishing it as a centre for arts, creativity and innovation, attracting more independent retailers and holding more community events such as the recent Diamond Jubilee celebrations in Clemens Street. Other ideas include building on Old Town’s restaurant base and its diverse ethnic food outlets and having commissioned artwork for the area’s railway bridge.